Why measure training attendance?

Do you measure training attendance?

There are lots of ways to do it. For example, you might measure development resource take-up/attendance as:

  • % of people that attended vs. places you want to fill
  • % of people that attended vs. number that registered
  • # of people that attended courses this month vs. target / previous month
  • % of employees who completed some form of learning this month
  • # of hours of learning delivered per employee this year
  • (Or a variety of other ways)

Whatever measure(s) you choose, it is important as there is a ‘return on investment’ (ROI) measure at the heart of it – i.e what do we get from learning for the cost of providing it?

Now before I go on, I must give a nod to John Edmonds who told us to measure outcomes of learning (business performance improvement, personal achievements etc) rather than input (learning hours).

So before measuring training attendance, you first need measure the extent to which you provide awesome learning to employees (so that you can show that the more learning they consume, the better the organisation performs).

However, whatever way you measure the outcomes, we can fairly safely assume that if we provide some learning resource (e.g. a training course) and only 50% of the spaces on the course were filled, we are delivering much lower the ROI than if we had filled the course. I.e. Fewer people learning, for same cost of delivery = lower ROI.

So, make sure you measure attendance to help you  identify any areas that are suffering (and therefore undermining your ROI).

For guidance on how to improve training attendance, watch this recording of my recent webinar: ‘3 Steps to Improve Training Attendance’. 

How do you measure attendance? What results are you getting? Please let me know using the comments below.

About The Author

Alexis Kingsbury

Alexis is founder of the Parentpreneur Accelerator and Making Greatness Ltd. He is a serial entrepreneur, with experience creating start-ups in a variety of areas, particularly in SaaS and EdTech. He is also a lucky husband and proud dad, and now helps other 'parentpreneurs' like him to achieve their dreams of having successful businesses, making a difference in the world, and spending time with the people they love.

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